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The Optimal Litter Box

Is your litter box old and scratched up? Did you know that bacteria can settle into the plastic cracks and cause lingering odors making it unpleasant for your cat, and for you!

Sterilite containers make a great, fresh, new boxes! Just make sure to select a box with low enough sides for your cat to easily get in,
especially if they are elderly or arthritic. You can also cut a hole or a low entry point along one side.

Did you know that most cats prefer uncovered boxes? You may think they need privacy, but a box with just one entrance/exit can make a cat feel threatened (by other cats, dogs or kids) because they have no way to escape if anyone comes near the box.

 

Here are some things to consider when evaluating your cat’s litter box: http://bit.ly/1p5MF1U

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Preparing your pet for July 4th

July 4th is getting close and our friends at the AVMA have shared these great tips for how you can prepare your pets for the holiday:

  • Make sure your pets – cats and dogs alike – have identification tags with up-to-date information. If you have horses, you might consider marking a safety (breakaway) halter with your contact information and leaving it on your horse during this stressful time.
  • If your pets aren’t already microchipped, talk with your veterinarian about microchipping. This simple procedure can greatly improve your chances of getting your pets back if they become lost.
  • If your pets are microchipped, make sure your contact information in the microchip registry is up-to-date.
  • Take a current photo of all of your cats, dogs and horses – just in case.
  • If your pet has historically been anxious on this holiday, or if you have reason to expect potentially harmful reactions, consider behavioral therapy to desensitize your pet and reduce the risk of problems. Some pets may need medication. Consult your veterinarian or a veterinary behaviorist.
  • Make sure the environment is safe and secure. If your neighbors set off fireworks at an unexpected time, is your yard secure enough to keep your pet contained? Are pasture fences secure enough to keep horses or other livestock confined? Evaluate your options, and choose the safest area for your animals; and make improvements if needed to make the area more secure.

Christmas Safety for Pets

Nothing can put a dent in your holiday celebrations like an emergency visit to a veterinary clinic! These tips from our friends at the AVMA may help prevent a holiday disaster.

  • Keep people food out of the reach of your pet, and ask your guests to do the same.
  • Make sure your pet doesn't have any access to treats, especially those containing chocolate, xylitol, grapes/raisins, onions or other toxic foods.
  • Don't leave your pet alone in the room with lit candles, a decorated tree or potpourri.
  • Keep holiday plants (especially holly, mistletoe and lillies) out of reach of pets.
  • Consider leaving the tinsel off your tree if you have a cat.
  • Secure your Christmas tree to keep it from falling over if your dog bumps it or your cat climbs it. Hanging lemon-scented car air fresheners in the tree may deter your cat from climbing it.

Ralph, Trooper Vet's AmbassaCat, wishes you a safe and happy holiday season…and leave the tinsel in storage! laugh

Ralph

Ralph, Trooper Vet’s AmbassaCat, encourages you to leave the garland and tinsel in storage for the safety of cats everywhere!

  

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Pets and Dehydration

It's hot and your dog or cat can get easily dehydrated!

Symptoms of dehydration include the gums of the mouth feeling tacky to touch and/or the skin may become slow to return to its natural position when pulled up. According to Carpenter, dehydration can lead to lethargy as it progresses, and the pet’s eyes may appear to be sunken. In mild to moderate cases, giving your pet small amounts of water to drink over time will help, but in severe cases they’ll need IV fluids administered at your veterinary hospital. To prevent this, it’s important to have clean, fresh water available for your pet at all times, in a container that can’t be tipped over accidentally.

To read more about this topic and pet summer safety, go to: https://www.aaha.org/pet_owner/pet_health_library/dog_care/general_health/keeping_your_dog_safe_from_summer_heat.aspx

Norristown Pet Blood Drive!

We were featured on an ABC News broadcast about our most recent blood drive!

Saturday, May 31, 2014
NORRISTOWN, Pa. (WPVI) –

A mobile blood-drive took from those with four legs instead of two at the Trooper Veterinary Hospital in Montgomery County.

The doggie donations will provide help for man’s best friend when they need it most.

To watch the video, go to:  http://6abc.com/87661
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