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All posts categorized as Veterinarians:

Meet the new doctor on our veterinary team!

Mia Puschak 2 cats_edited-1

 

 

 

 

 

 

Trooper Veterinary Hospital is pleased to announce the addition of Dr. Mia (Bleier) Puschak to our team of veterinarians.  Dr. Puschak received her veterinary degree from the University of Illinois College of Veterinary Medicine in 2012.  She joins us with several years of experience in both general practice and emergency medicine, having worked in both Montgomery and Delaware counties.  Dr. Puschak enjoys many aspects of veterinary medicine, including Internal Medicine, radiology and ultrasound, and nutrition.

We look forward to introducing you to the newest talent on our team of professionals and Dr. Puschak looks forward to meeting our clients and patients.  

February is Pet Dental Health Month!

February is National Pet Dental Health Month!

(Brought to you by the AVMA)

Don't turn your nose to Fido's or Fluffy's bad breath! That odor might signify a serious health risk, with the potential to damage not only your pet's teeth and gums but its internal organs as well.

To address the significance of oral health care for pets, the AVMA sponsors National Pet Dental Health Month every February. Click on the links below to learn more about  how you can improve the dental (and overall) health of your pets. 

Test Yourself

How much do you know about your pet's dental health? Take our quiz to find out!

Watch

Dr. Sheldon Rubin gives easy, step-by-step instructions on how to teach a dog or cat to accept a daily tooth brushing. He also describes healthy treats, and explains the true risks of periodontal disease in pets. 

Periodontal disease is the most common clinical condition in cats and dogs even though it's completely preventable. Dr. Cindy Charlier explains what periodontal disease is and how we can prevent our pets from getting it.

Listen

Dr. Jan Bellows, a former president of the American Veterinary Dental College and owner of All Pets Dental in Weston, Fla., discussed the importance of dental health for our pets in an interview for our Animal Trackspodcast series.

 

dental health

Lyme Disease Reminder

Veterinarian and pediatrician groups issue reminder about risk of Lyme disease in humans and pets.

Even during the last weeks of summer, it's important to remember children and pets are at greater risk of being infected with Lyme disease and other tick-borne diseases such as anaplasmosis, ehrlichiosis, or Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever. Because people and their pets often spend time in the same environments where Lyme and other disease-transmitting ticks are found, the American Veterinary Medical Association (AVMA) and the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) are working together to offer advice to households with children and pets.

​According to the AVMA and the AAP, people whose animals have been diagnosed with Lyme disease should consult their physician about their own risk. Likewise, people who have been diagnosed with Lyme disease should consult their veterinarian to assess their pet's risk based on the animal's lifestyle and possible environmental exposures.

​Lyme disease is an infection caused by a bacterium known as Borrelia burgdorfori. It is spread by the bite of the tiny black-legged tick, which is found in forests or grassy, wooded, marshy areas near rivers, lakes or oceans. People or animals may be bitten while hiking or camping, during other outdoor activities, or even while spending time in their backyards.

​This disease appears in specific areas of the United States, including southern New England states; eastern Mid-Atlantic States; the upper Midwest, particularly Wisconsin and Minnesota; and the West Coast, particularly northern California. In analyzing a patient's risk of having or contracting Lyme disease, physicians and veterinarians in other areas of the country will want to know if their patient has visited a place where the disease is found. The United States Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has a map detailing confirmed cases of Lyme disease throughout the years.

​In animals, Lyme disease usually does not cause any clinical signs at all. Symptomatic dogs with Lyme disease might have lack of appetite, lameness, and joint swelling. Recurrent lameness also is possible. The involved extremity may be tender due to joint inflammation that lasts from days to weeks and migrates from one extremity to another. Also, animals may experience fever and decreased activity.

​If a child or pet is diagnosed with Lyme disease, it is likely that other family members or pets also have been in an environment that could lead to exposure. Therefore, the initial case of Lyme disease in a household should serve to flag the risk of exposure and suggest a need for other family members or pets to notify their physicians and veterinarians, who can advise about further evaluation or testing.

​There are many things humans can do to avoid exposure to tick bites, including: avoiding areas where ticks are found; covering arms, legs, head and feet when outdoors; wearing light-colored clothing; using insecticides; and checking for ticks once indoors.

​Likewise, people with pets are encouraged to speak with their veterinarian about tick preventive products, to clear shrubbery next to homes and keep lawns well maintained, and to check for ticks on themselves and their animals once indoors.

​Since it was named after a number of cases were identified in Lyme, Conn., in 1975, thousands of cases of the disease have been reported in humans and animals across the country and around the world. By knowing about Lyme disease and how to prevent it, you can help keep all members of your family—human and animal—safe.

For more information, go to: https://www.avma.org/news/pressroom/pages/avma-aap-lymedisease.aspx

Fleas and Ticks

They’re creepy, they’re crawly…and they can carry diseases. Fleas and ticks are not just a nuisance, but pose animal and human health risks. They suck your pet’s blood, they suck human blood, and can transmit diseases.  Some of the diseases that fleas and ticks can transmit from animals to humans (zoonotic diseases) include plague, Lyme disease, Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever, bartonellosis and others.  That’s why it’s critical to protect your pets from these pesky parasites and keep the creepy crawlies out of your home.

Fortunately, veterinarians recommend many effective flea and tick preventives on the market to help control the pests and prevent the spread of zoonotic diseases. Knowing what kind of product to use, and how to use it, is critical to the health and safety of your pet. Many are spot-on (topical) products that are applied directly to your pet’s skin, but there are some that are given orally (by mouth). Although medicines and pesticides must meet U.S. government-required safety standards before they can be sold, it is still critical that pet owners carefully consider their flea and tick preventive options (and closely read the label) before they treat their pets with one of these products.

To learn more, go to: https://www.avma.org/public/PetCare/Pages/Safe-use-of-flea-and-tick-preventive-products.aspx

Pet Food and Cold Weather

Keep your pet at a healthy weight throughout the winter. Some pet owners feel
that a little extra weight gives their pet some extra protection from cold, but
the health risks associated with that extra weight don’t make it worth doing.
Watch your pet’s body condition and keep them in the healthy range. Outdoor pets
will require more calories in the winter to generate enough body heat and energy
to keep them warm – talk to your veterinarian about your pet’s nutritional needs
during cold weather.

For some more tips, go to: https://www.avma.org/public/PetCare/Pages/Cold-weather-pet-safety.aspx

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