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Meet the new doctor on our veterinary team!

Mia Puschak 2 cats_edited-1

 

 

 

 

 

 

Trooper Veterinary Hospital is pleased to announce the addition of Dr. Mia (Bleier) Puschak to our team of veterinarians.  Dr. Puschak received her veterinary degree from the University of Illinois College of Veterinary Medicine in 2012.  She joins us with several years of experience in both general practice and emergency medicine, having worked in both Montgomery and Delaware counties.  Dr. Puschak enjoys many aspects of veterinary medicine, including Internal Medicine, radiology and ultrasound, and nutrition.

We look forward to introducing you to the newest talent on our team of professionals and Dr. Puschak looks forward to meeting our clients and patients.  

The Optimal Litter Box

Is your litter box old and scratched up? Did you know that bacteria can settle into the plastic cracks and cause lingering odors making it unpleasant for your cat, and for you!

Sterilite containers make a great, fresh, new boxes! Just make sure to select a box with low enough sides for your cat to easily get in,
especially if they are elderly or arthritic. You can also cut a hole or a low entry point along one side.

Did you know that most cats prefer uncovered boxes? You may think they need privacy, but a box with just one entrance/exit can make a cat feel threatened (by other cats, dogs or kids) because they have no way to escape if anyone comes near the box.

 

Here are some things to consider when evaluating your cat’s litter box: http://bit.ly/1p5MF1U

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Dog Chew Recall

United Pet Group, a division of Spectrum Brands, Inc. is voluntarily recalling multiple brands of packages of rawhide dog chew products that were distributed to retail outlets and sold online in the U.S. The recall involves the brands and products described below.

The recall was initiated after  United Pet Group identified that certain of its rawhide chew manufacturing facilities located in Mexico and Colombia, as well as one of its suppliers in Brazil, were using a quaternary ammonium compound mixture as a processing aid in the manufacturing of rawhide chews. The compound is an anti-microbial chemical that is approved for cleaning food processing equipment, but it has not been approved in the U.S. as a processing aid in the production of rawhide chews for dogs.

United Pet Group received very limited reports of pet illness based on the volume of possibly affected rawhide chew products manufactured and distributed. The primary complaint received from consumers was that the affected product had an unpleasant odor. Diarrhea and vomiting were also reported.

Exposure to quaternary ammonium compounds through direct ingestion may cause the following symptoms in dogs: reduced appetite, and gastric irritation including diarrhea and vomiting. These symptoms may require treatment by a veterinarian depending on severity.

The affected product was distributed nationwide from United Pet Group’s Edwardsville, Illinois distribution facility and was delivered to consumers through various retail establishments including online outlets. All of the dog chew products included in the voluntary recall identify an expiration date ranging from 06/01/2019 through 05/31/2020 located on the back of the package.

For more information, go to: https://www.fda.gov/Safety/Recalls/ucm562701.htm

Pet Dander

The following article was written by the American Lung Association.  Please feel free to call us if you have any questions.

Pet Dander

What Is Pet Dander?

Pet dander is composed of tiny, even microscopic, flecks of skin shed by cats, dogs, rodents, birds and other animals with fur or feathers. These bits of skin can cause reactions in people who are specifically allergic to these triggers.

Additional allergy triggers or allergens come from sources other than the animal's skin. Proteins found in saliva, urine and feces from cats, dogs and other pets can cause allergic reactions in some people. The most common allergies are caused by the Fel d I protein from cats and the Can f I and Can f II proteins from dogs. Dried saliva containing allergens may flake off from an animal's fur and become airborne, where it is inhaled by the allergic person. Dust from dried feces can be suspended in the same way. 1

Which Animals Pose the Biggest Problems?

Cats are kept as pets in 27 percent of homes in the United States and dogs are found in 32 percent. However, roughly twice as many people report allergies to cats when compared to dogs. Research also indicates that male cats produce less Fel d I allergen than female cats, although the reason is not clear. 1

Animals with fur may be more likely to carry allergens from other sources, like dust, but the fur itself is generally not a trigger. For that reason, short-haired or hairless animals contribute dander and allergens to indoor air pollution just as effectively as long-haired animals do. There is no such thing as a non-allergenic dog or cat. 1

How Do Pet Allergens Occur?

Pet allergens are very light weight and small. They remain suspended in the air for a long time, much longer than allergens from cockroaches or dust mites. Because of their microscopic size and jagged shape, pet allergens easily stick to furniture, bedding, fabrics and many items carried into and out of the home. Animal dander is easily spread through the home and out to public places like schools and hospitals. 1 They can be found even in homes and buildings without pets. 1

How Do Pet Allergens Affect Health?

Some people are allergic to pets or have asthma that is triggered by pet allergens. For these individuals, breathing animal allergens can make respiratory symptoms worse and lead to a decline in the ability of the lungs to function. The concentrations of an allergen required to cause a reaction vary greatly by individual. 1

People with allergies may experience upper and lower respiratory tract symptoms including congestion, sneezing, runny nose, chest tightness and wheezing. Other symptoms are itching, watery eyes, and eczema or rashes. 1

How Do You Control Pet Allergens?

For homes with sensitive individuals, the best way to protect indoor air quality is to remove the animal from the home. However, pet allergens may stay in the home for months after the pet is gone because the allergens remain in house dust. Allergy and asthma symptoms may take weeks or even months to improve. 1

If the pet stays in the home, keep it out of the bedroom of anyone who has asthma or allergies. Do not allow the pet on furniture, especially upholstery, and keep the pet away from carpets. Clean the home often and do not allow dust to accumulate.

For more information and article sources, go to: http://www.lung.org/our-initiatives/healthy-air/indoor/indoor-air-pollutants/pet-dander.html

Dr. Perdue: Secretary of Agriculture

The AVMA is pleased that a veterinarian, Secretary Sonny Perdue, DVM, was confirmed to the position of United States Secretary of Agriculture. With the country facing challenges and opportunities on issues requiring veterinary expertise, such as animal health, animal welfare and public health, having strong veterinary leadership at the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) is more important than ever.

Veterinarians possess unique medical expertise that drives scientifically sound policy decisions. Veterinary leadership at all levels of the USDA is crucial to creating and executing effective policies, and Secretary Perdue’s appointment is an encouraging sign that veterinarians will continue to be valued at the agency.

Including input from veterinarians in USDA decisions is increasingly important as advancing technologies and science-based evidence shed light on the interdependency of animal health and human health. Keeping food supplies safe, ensuring responsible drug use and preventing zoonotic disease are all areas within which collaboration among veterinary medicine and other scientific, health and environmental disciplines is valuable. The AVMA supports this collaboration through One Health, and veterinary leadership at the USDA offers further opportunities to implement One Health principles through public policy.

Secretary Perdue earned his DVM from the University of Georgia in 1971.​​

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